The Japanese Surrender – In Lincoln, Nebraska

8:00 p.m. Thursday, August 13, 1945. Lincoln, Nebraska. Marj took advantage of the brief quiet from the teletype machines and looked around the tiny United Press bureau office. The desks were cluttered with carbon papers, empty Coke bottles, dirty coffee cups, cigarette butts. Editors and reporters throughout the Lincoln Journal building were sleepy, their nerves… Continue reading The Japanese Surrender – In Lincoln, Nebraska

An International Gathering of Women, 1965

Last Sunday was International Women’s Day. In checking up on the history of the event, I discovered that its first observation was in 1909 in New York – organized by the Socialist Party of America. Socialists and Communists continued the commemorations for many years with strikes and sometimes days off for women. It wasn’t until… Continue reading An International Gathering of Women, 1965

Language Matters

In July of 1979, Bob made history. After several years of protest from women’s groups – especially those around the gulf coast – Bob was the first male-name hurricane. Or perhaps himicane.  Jason Samenow provides an interesting history of this change, including the worries of many in the meteorological community that storms named after men… Continue reading Language Matters

Equal Pay – Now and Then

A few days ago – Tuesday, April 8 – was “Equal Pay Day” – the date that symbolizes how long a woman would have to work (on average) to earn what a man earned the previous calendar year. President Obama commemorated the day by signing two executive orders providing incremental fixes to address continuing pay… Continue reading Equal Pay – Now and Then

Equality in the Newsroom? Not so much

Marj Paxson’s first job was with the United Press wire service in Omaha, Nebraska during World War II. It was there she had her first brush with sexual harassment, fighting off the advances of a clerk at the Nebraska Supreme Court.   Twice during her career, Marj was demoted when the section she was capably… Continue reading Equality in the Newsroom? Not so much

What’s in a Name?

At first, they were the “Society Pages” – portions of big city mid-nineteenth century newspapers devoted to the comings and goings of the white glove crowd. Soon these pages evolved into the “Women’s Sections” that continued the society reporting but expanded to cover what were considered important women’s concerns in the early 20th century –… Continue reading What’s in a Name?